Spassky

Boris Spassky 2009 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Boris Spasski, Chess Olympiad 1984 in...

English: Boris Spasski, Chess Olympiad 1984 in Saloniki, Photographer Gerhard Hund. Deutsch: Boris Spasski, Schacholympiade 1984 in Saloniki, Photo von Gerhard Hund. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In his games, Boris Spassky is always looking for aggressive moves, moves that pose one threat after another. This is what has been defined as “aggressive-thinking mode”. Instead of using defensive (passive) moves he answer with threats whenever possible. The aim is the attempt to break the coordination of his opponents’ pieces.In the following game we can see this feature in different moments.

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chesswrit

spassky_moscu2

B. Spassky

(As an homage to Spassky and my father, who taught me the moves around 1971 and from whom I first heard of Boris, here are some of the notes I wrote when I found some interesting stylistic features in Spassky’s games.)

In his games, Boris Spassky is always looking for aggressive moves, moves that pose one threat after another. This is what has been defined as “aggressive-thinking mode”. Instead of using defensive (passive) moves he answer with threats whenever possible. The aim is the attempt to break the coordination of his opponents’ pieces.In the following game we can see this feature in different moments. (Please bear in mind that these notes are totally subjective)

W.: A. Lein (0)

B.: B. Spassky (1)

Sochi, 1964

1. e4 , c5/ 2. Nf3, Nc6/ 3. d4, cd4/ 4. Nxd4, e6/ 5. Nxc6, bc6/ 6. Bd3, Nf6/ 7. 0-0, d5/…

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